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Khyenrab

Breaking a vow

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Yet I wondered whether there was also some kind of ecological "pesticide", that is pesticide made of plants.

 

Surlfur is found in the nature...

 

You could also put some nettles into water, left to soak two-three days, and spread this liquid on plants. But, I found it less effective than sulfur...

 

By the way, if you let the nettles longuer time, it will become a natural fertiliser... but it really smells bad then! ;)

 

Thank you.

Gigu

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Tashi Delek!

 

Generally, there are some more things one can do about plant "lice": one is to not over-fertilise the plants, as this causes that their structure is more spongy, which attracts lice. Adding potassium strengthens the structure of the plants, so wood-ashes are good as fertiliser. The plant can be powdered with ashes too, to prevent lice-attack.

 

Another approach is the mixing of plants: nasturtiums are especially popular because they repel some lice and attract other species of lice (the black ones), so the plants near them are safer. They are often planted around fruit trees for this purpose.

Wormwood, thyme and lavender also repel lice, as does the flower called tagetes. And savory (=šetraj) is especially recommended to be planted with beans and horsebeans to repel the lice from them.

Of course, this makes the garden look less "tidy" so some people may not like it. :wink:

 

I heard that wormwood-infusion is good to spray the plants. Some recommend rhubarb tea for this purpose. They both don't kill the lice, but make the plants less tasty for them.

 

All the best.

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Dear Gigu and Wangmo,

 

thank you so much for the answer! :lol: In fact, I am very fond of such "untidy" gardens, they are simply beautiful, I always wanted to create one like that, but didn't have the knowledge. I will try with one of the recommended plants ... it happens that I have seeds of nasturtiums. :lol::lol::lol::lol:

 

Does any of those recommended plants prevent also lice on other vegetables, such as mangold?

 

Also experimental question - what about the green tea infusion? Sometimes it tastes pretty like nettles...

 

 

All good <|:)

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Tashi Delek!

 

Does any of those recommended plants prevent also lice on other vegetables, such as mangold?

Of course - lavender, thyme, nasturtium and tagetes.

Tagetes is very useful, as you can buy whole trays of them now, quite cheap, and plant them directly all around the garden - no need to wait for something to grow from seeds. :wink:

 

But here is a small list for an "untidy" garden:

VEGETABLES

onion, carrots - mutual protection against onion / carrot fly

beans - repel pests from eggplants

garlic - repels mites from tomatoes, protects vegetables from ash mildew

tomato, celery - protect cabbage from earthfleas, butterflies (whitings)

all kinds of cabbage - protect celery from rust

horse radish - protects potatoes from the Colorado beetle

SPICES

basil- repels whitefly

sage - against cabbage whitings (butterflies), snails and carrot fly

rosemary - against snails, whitefly and whitings (cabbage butterflies)

thyme - against lice, snails and earthfleas

savory - protects horsebeans and beans from lice

mint - repels ants and earthfleas

lavender - repels ants and lice

chervil - protects salad from mildew and lice

chives - against ash mildew

FLOWERS

calendula - against nematodes and snails

nasturtium - attracts lice, repels whitefly and snails

tagetes - protects from Colorado beetles, lice and nematodes

 

This list isn't complete, of course. For example, lavender and garlic are good with roses too, to protect them agains lice and mildew; garlic protects strawberries from rot etc.

 

Also experimental question - what about the green tea infusion? Sometimes it tastes pretty like nettles...

I don't know, I never heard about using green tea infusion in the garden ...

But black tea leaves (the remains after you make the tea) are a good fertiliser for roses.

 

All the best. :)

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