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Simona

Does the faith has to be "blind"?

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Tashi Delek.

 

I had dreams in which I was climbing upon the stairs in some flat. Everything went smooth til the moment I became aware that I am climbing (it is possible to become aware about something in the dreams, though). When I became aware I couldn`t move anymore and I started to hear all the voices in the flat, what people were doing to each other, etc. I became terified about where I was finding myself. Then, I said to myself to not to think and just go on. I was able somehow to climb further, but with a lot of effort and constant fear, if I will fall. Do you think it is the same with the faith? If someone is completely devoted and doing the Buddist`s practices with "all the heart", I can say if one "become the practice" itself, can in some moment "slip" or find in the position in which I was in my dreams, if become aware of what s/he is doing after all? I hope you all will understand and I don`t wish to clash with this on the intelectual level. So, any remarks, even might looks like alogical are highly welcome.

 

Best regards,

Simona

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Tashi Delek,

 

I don't see faith in the Three Jewels as something blind.

 

It's like when you want a luxurious house very bad - you automatically have great faith and appreciation for the money you earn - there is no questioning, whether the money is good or bad. It is very good. :)

When you have the same goal as Lord Buddha did, that is to be of the greatest benefit to the world, faith in Dharma comes naturally, and doesn't find the space to decline, only increases more and more. That would be the ideal.

 

With best wishes,

Khyenrab

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Guest Ani.Chödrön

Tashi Delek,

 

faith has different levels and doubts have different roles, + or – (it is a changing mental factor).

 

We can discern three kinds of faith:

- blind faith,

- emotionally based faith,

- logically ascertained faith.

 

They are successively deeper and more stable, regarding to the outer circumstances which might challenge the faith about this or that aspect of Dharma. The depth of our faith depends of course also on our past lives.

 

I would say that analysis and faith perfectly support each other, they increase each other. To my knowledge, this is one of the aims of the monastic debates. ;-} :wink:

 

But on the other hand, some people might need more and some less logical checking, proves and similar to establish stable faith. Buddhism is rational, but in the West we have often a habit to rummage among the theories, forgetting that their purpose is practical. -8)-

 

When the faith is firmly established, we should guard it carefully, because it is the faith in the Dharma, the faith in the Lama, which enables us to progress. !:!

 

All the very best,

chödrön

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Tashi Delek!

 

Do you think it is the same with the faith? If someone is completely devoted and doing the Buddist`s practices with "all the heart", I can say if one "become the practice" itself, can in some moment "slip" or find in the position in which I was in my dreams, if become aware of what s/he is doing after all?

I think this depends on how much "heart" one puts into the practice, and how much thinking. If someone for example meets with Buddhism and just feels well with it or likes its ceremonies etc., and engages in it because of this liking, it may very well happen that after some time a moment of awakening will come, and the person won't know anymore what they are doing there. I would presume that this may well happen in moments when the faith is challenged because the spiritual Path brings something unpleasant for the ego.

But if you arrive to the logical conclusion that you wish to engage in Buddhism because you decide it is the Path which leads where you wish to go and provides means to really arrive there, then such a moment can arise too - but you already know the answer to the question "what am I doing here?" and just have to recollect it from your memory.

 

Best wishes. :)

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Tashi Delek.

 

Thank you for all your suggestions, in some I find myself in the others not. To walk on the Path it means to me to transcend myself (basically ego and all deluded mental states that supports it). It demands beside the faith and devotion full concentration (which I do not have it all the time), a lot of the wisdom (which I do not have it so much), developing equanimity and the other abilities and powers also. I am aware of the limits of my human body, limits of the time and of the space, limits of my karma, limits of my knowledge and limits of my practice. Climbing on the Path I feel like to undermine myself. My ego is my device to hang on in the life and now, I have to put it down. What will remain, with what I will hang on then? From this point of view I am astonished at the powers and wisdom of some beings as Bodhisattvas are or put it in the other way I am not surprised why Buddha Chenrezi has four or even hundred arms. Till now it seems to me something self-evident and yes, obvious. But, it is not. Now, the hardest piece of the Path has came...I hope that you all already have scaled it.

 

Best regards,

Simona

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Now, the hardest piece of the Path has came...I hope that you all already have scaled it.

........o, i wouldn't say so....

kind regards,

:*

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Tashi Delek to All,

 

I have yet another question about faith. It has arisen to me just yesterday, when I was listening to the (otherwise perfect) speech of this year's Prešeren laureate Milan Dekleva. At some point he said that no one should become a slave (I don't remember the exact expression) to the Lotus, Cross, Half-moon or turbo-capitalism that uses the human being as a pure resource and tries to find out more and more effective ways of its (human being's) use to make profit. This kind of opinions are not rare in the area of the "intellectuals", but could one think of them a kind of ideology, i.e. attachment to certain (wrong) opinions that are said to be completely "free" (but not non-attached)?

I hope that, what Milan had in mind, was reduction of faith down to ideological belief, that can happen to anyone if the faith is not also logically ascertained.

From what I heard on the teachings, I cannot think about Buddhism as ideology - although it is a samsaric tool that leads us toward the realisation of Emptiness and Boddhicitta, which are, of course, very far away form any ideology. And yet - here arises my question - before I reach realisation, i find myself in the somewhat "blind"-faith state.

 

Has any one of you ever seen this danger in himself/herself? And how to avoid this fall into reduction of Buddhism to an ideology or fanaticism? Of course attaining Wisdom woud be the right thing... but if one does not have it (yet)?

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Dear Kunzang,

when I find myself in doubts, I compare my state of mind of now with that of before I met Dharma, regarding happiness, stability, sensfulness, sense of (meaningfull) creativity, freedom of choice, efficency, being a better person. Is there a difference? If yes, I look where is the difference. I then honestly try to tell what brought to it.

I then remember all those moments when reading Dharma books or listenig to the teachings when felt that things just so fit in. There must have been, at least one, one is sometimes all we need, right? <|:)

I wish you all the very best,

Pamo

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Tashi Delek dear Kunzang!

 

And how to avoid this fall into reduction of Buddhism to an ideology or fanaticism?

 

I’m not sure I’m taking in your topic very good. I rather encounter doupts then fanaticism.But anyway, when I’m sticked to one particular concept I’m not in flow and by all means, I do not contact understanding of inpermanents :). It is sign of beeing not grounded, not in tuch with myself. Sombody will say what self you are talking about,there is no Self. Yes, but one has to rich that level. Till then I will use an idea, analaysing it like to go about on cruthces and belive in MY very next step. I think the faith is a process too, which should be developed in the moust safe and only reasonable frame – guru devotion relationship.Otherwise I see no reasen for faithfull attitude. Till then, the common leavel of faith and reasonable amound of doubts are signs of mental health.

With best wishes,

tatjana

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Has any one of you ever seen this danger in himself/herself?

 

dear Kunzang,

 

thank you for putting up this question. I often think about it too. It helped me a lot to get some opinions about it.

 

I remember myself a couple of years ago, when a good friend of mine started doing yoga very intensively, going on regular retreats etc. that was the first time I met with the concept of "following a spiritual guide" in reality. I remember I did not understand her devotion and I believed I was the "clever" one, the "realistic" one, "she must be blind", etc. I regret my such behaviour because I feel I am on a very similar path now (and I feel very content with it). Nevertheless I cannot help noticing that some of the people around me are suspicious about my present behaviour. For them any other religion than Catholic Christian has the scent of something esoteric and manipulative. I also catch myself censoring my speech not to use the word "guru" because of the admixture it carries along in the western world.

It helps me to attend Teachings regularly to meet with the people of similar belief, values and religious behaviour.

 

Though I often notice the doubt arising in me ... then I analyse it ... and most of the times it is only my wounded ego struggling to get in control of the situation as it used to be years before ... :) I agree with Tatjana, this is probably a process.

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Thank you to you all, Tatjana, Pamo and Mavrica, for your answers!

Yesterday I did my piece of analytic meditation as well and so I found out that it is - as you said, Mavrica - my "old" ego that does not want to be called "brain washed by religion". Yet, there is also another problem: my work, the way how I earn my living, is connected to this "intellectual" sphere of supposed "free thought" that, yes, can analyze what is wrong with our society (to a certain extent), but knows not how to help (to itself, in the first place!) But this did not bother me that much, as I discovered another layer of the problem: the fear that at certain moment I will have to decide between my work and Dharma... Of course, it was an attachment to my work speaking to me.

 

And yet, after all this thinking, there was this awareness that it was through Buddhism that I began to discover the tricks of my ego and that through Buddhism that my life gained a bit differend flavour. And - yes, faith is a process, though logically ascertained faith - so I feel - should be counterbalanced with the faith of "heart" or of the whole being. And doubts, so I think, are not erased before one attains high(est) realizations.

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Tashi Delek.

 

At some point he said that no one should become a slave (I don't remember the exact expression) to the Lotus, Cross, Half-moon or turbo-capitalism that uses the human being as a pure resource and tries to find out more and more effective ways of its (human being's) use to make profit.

 

The danger in seeing Buddhism just as a philosophy is that this could lead toward ideology and separate one from real life. Seeing Buddhism stricktly as a religion could lead toward dogmatism and supernaturalism. These two ways of thinking can be seen as two extremes, though. To attain and maintain the Middle Path:

1.ethics

2.pure mind

3.wisdom

 

Faith is the way you live your life.

 

Best regards,

Simona

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Dear Kunzang,

 

And doubts, so I think, are not erased before one attains high(est) realizations

 

To avoid misunderstanding about “healthy” doupts and those who can lead us astray here is one post from our very good dharma friend. Thank you :* . I will post it immediately:

 


Sogyal Rinpoche: Glimpse After Glimpse: February 9

 

Doubts demand from us a real skilfulness in dealing with them, and I notice how few people have any idea how to pursue doubts or to use them. It seems ironic that in a civilization that so worships the power of deflation and doubt, hardly anyone has the courage to deflate the claims of doubt itself—to do as one Hindu master said: turn the dogs of doubt on doubt itself, to unmask cynicism, and to uncover what fear, despair, hopelessness, and tired conditioning it springs from. Then doubt would no longer be an obstacle, but a door to realization, and whenever doubt appeared in the mind, a seeker would welcome it as a means of going deeper into the truth.

 


tatjana

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And dear dear Kuenzang,

thank you for this precious reminder: faith is what you live. Also Rinpoche made a similar thought at the first teaching this year.

 

All the very best,

 

kuenzang 2

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